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Federations deliberate over prioritisation

Sat, 25 July 2015 01:01
by online
News Flash

Deliberations regarding the prioritisation and categorisation of sport codes in the country began between the Namibia Sports Commission and the various National Federations.

The framework criteria for the Ranking of Sport Codes will primarily focus on five areas, namely participation, governance and leadership, development, international achievement and national interest. These framework criteria are based on foundations that will develop Namibian sport and assist in meeting other national objectives.

“Currently, sport codes are ranked in categories A, B, C and D, a basis used to determine funding grants allocated to sport codes for different purposes,” said Acting Chief Administrator, Harald Fülle, adding, “Although the new ranking and categorization system will not be in the best interest of every sport code, the assessment seeks to look at the benefits and value it will bring to the country.”

This of course comes after many federations in Namibia have lamented what they deem as insufficient funds from the sports commission in order to run operations. Federations aspiring to benefit from development grants would be required to submit a development plan, with a national competition structure in place hosted in towns other than Windhoek. Development categories inclusive of youth and a wide regional spread of coaches, umpires and athletes across regions have also been listed as measurement tools for recommendation.

“The current weighting system for each area has not been finalised, as further discussions still need to be held with the federations. The development of a resource allocation model to determine funding and support to the sport codes based on their ranking and prioritization are some of the steps that will form part of the next planning phase,” Fülle further stated.

Speaking at the meeting, the Deputy Minister of Sport, Agnes Tjongarero highlighted the importance of decentralizing development across all fourteen regions. She stated that government was aware of the limited resources that were available to develop sport, but advised sport codes to be strategic in their development initiatives by firstly focusing on the nearest towns and gradually moving to other towns.