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Public indecency is illegal

Mon, 14 October 2013 03:55
by Villager Reporter


it has come to our attention that under our liberal democracy, some members of the public have bad habits that involve public indecency.
Issues of concern include opportunities that public members often create whenever they seclude themselves and their partners in isolated places to engage in sexual activities. Not long ago, two couples were killed in the Northern Industrial Area while ‘busy’ in the nearby bushes.  
Defining public indecency is not simple, because it takes on many forms. A narrow definition of what public indecency may, however, result in the exclusion of some facets.
It’s however, safe to say, according our municipal by-laws, indecent behaviour is any conduct in any indecent gesture in public view or any street or public place. If anyone is caught engaging, especially in public indecency, they could face a penalty of N$1000.
These are not the challenges that concern City Police the most. Of concern here are the basic assumptions that underpin the belief that it is individuals’ constitutional right to have sex whenever and wherever they deem fit. This statement is misleading. As the saying goes, “Where your right ends, another person’s rights begin.”
We further noted with deep concern that despite the depth of education and public knowledge the Windhoek City Police Service share with the general public through various radio stations and television media, aimed at impacting behavioural changes, public members still continue to engage in public indecency.
In a nutshell, public indecency leads to increased levels of assaults, cases of rape and mugging, which are prohibited. And those who continue to engage in such ill-advised activities should be informed to put an immediate end to this new social ill or face the full wrath of the law.