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IUM to explore Public Private Partnerships

Sun, 28 October 2012 19:00
by Jemima Beukes
Education

 

Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreements are important, because they increase access to education for disadvantaged groups and can expand the availability of specialised skills in both sectors, University of Namibia (Unam) vice chancellor, Lazarus Hangula said last week.
While delivering a keynote address at a Development Seminar held by the International University of Management (IUM) as part of its 10th graduation celebrations, Hangula noted, governments the world over explore ways to co-operate in PPPs. This is to rapidly improve both infrastructure networks as well as enhance service delivery to their people.
“What is fundamentally needed in Namibia is a renewed sense of ethical responsibility and a broadly-based recognition of the need to nurture a culture of more sustainable value-creation through a shared responsibility,” he said, adding, the PPP concept recognises the existence of co-responsibility in providing educational services besides public finance and public service delivery.
He further noted it’s important to look at how public education can be privately managed and accessed. PPPs, he added, stimulate ownership, enhance resources and allow the sharing of risks.
“Therefore, increasing the private sector’s role in education can have several potential advantages over the traditional public delivery of education,” Angula said.
Furthermore, Stimulus Equity managing director, Monika Kalondo, suggested it is important to analyse relationships between such partnerships to ensure it is done in an optimal manner.