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Other Articles from The Villager

Stop complaining!

Mon, 16 November 2015 18:40
by Charmaine Ngatjiheue


I am probably one of the few people embracing the recent decisions taken by Government, whilst others feel it is the highest order of crap.

I am of the opinion that seen in hindsight, a bunch of you people criticising the decisions by Government lately will have to swallow your pride as you sit down to reassess yourself. We enjoy complaining a lot, and we never have better ideas which may possibly solve the problem at hand.

Criticism is good, but is it uplifting criticism? When Finance Minister Calle Schlettwein tabled the budget for the very first time, we were all aware that it’s a pro-poor budget. Government has introduced a raft of policies and interventions as part of its agenda to eradicate poverty by 2025, and it is in line with the envisaged Vision 2030, whereby we see ourselves as an industrialised country by then.

Again, this has been criticised because of our human nature. We always want to see tangible results, and complain somewhere as if we make a dollar from complaining about what Government does and does not do. As far-fetched as all these policies may seem, we need to realise that all these things will just not fall into place in one day.

Please man, be realistic instead of sitting there and finding reason to complain without a better suggestion. Government’s Food Bank will soon be realised, and believe you me, the complaints were just a little too extreme. People are saying things like this will create laziness as people would not want to work for what they eat as they would be receiving it on a silver platter. And you know what, maybe that is true.

But do you consider the number of poor people who would be assisted, those people who go to bed without eating, those who pray to God for their next meal?

This Food Bank would be the answer. I thought we were all fighting for poverty to come to an end. How did we get to this place where people say things like “it is not your problem that people are poor”, or “Government is to blame for poor people in the country?”

Government also made mention of the provision for low-income-earners and the Basic Income Grant for all Namibians, and I applaud this move. It shows that something is being done, and initiatives are being formulated to assist the poor. So, you say it is long overdue?

I hear you, and you have a point. But if you look at it, Government can only do so much, and this is where you and I come in. Government has created the Ministry of Poverty Eradication, and that is not enough. The community should also chip in. What has raised eyebrows over the past two weeks is the planned introduction of a Solidarity Tax.

People have been complaining that they are already poor, and yet Government wants to take from them. When you look at it, though, it is not like that. We need to stop being greedy and selfish. Instead of complaining, we should rather try to understand what exactly is meant by the Solidarity Tax first.

We should not feel cheated by Government, especially seeing that Schlettwein has shown how transparent the country is with its finances through a Mid-Term Budget Review process. President Dr Hage Geingob could not have done a better job than putting Schlettwein at the Finance Ministry. Suta Kavari, an Investment Strategist at Capricorn Asset Management, was upbeat.

“I believe the Mid- Term Budget Review process is a welcome addition to the budgeting process. It opens up the budgeting process to more scrutiny, and offers an account of how budget votes have been appropriated. It also offers a window into the government’s spending and policy intentions for the next fiscal year”, he noted.