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Other Articles from The Villager

Are we cursed?

Tue, 13 October 2015 16:07
by Charmaine Ngatjiheue
Editorial

Honestly, if you look at the escalating power and water crisis in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, all one can ask is whether we are a cursed region.

This feels like the world has fallen on top of us. It feels like it everything is tumbling down. Some people are left in the dark (literally), while others have been left without clean drinking water. Now on top of these, these people do not have a roof over their heads.

To you who has not experienced these, it may seem surreal. Others feel it is exaggerated. To them, the situation has not worsened to such an extent. But wake up and smell the coffee, this is real, as real as it can be. No filter.

One day you will wake up without water in your house, or you will wake up without lights on, and realise that the power and water crisis in SADC had escalated.

It makes sense that there are people who question their existence on earth, and wonder whether there is a higher power because it feels as though everything is crumbling down. It makes sense.

First, we are told we are facing a power crisis, then suddenly we have a water crisis. Could it get any worse than this? How is it possible for all these things hit us all at once? Did the leaders notice these things, yet failed to let the nation know because they wanted us to be at peace?

However, we should not blame our leaders if this is what they have opted to do as it is ideal for them to maintain the peace, despite the pressure exceeding the limit.

Even if the crisis has reached boiling point, our leaders have to keep calm. Not a single gram of worry should be portrayed. Whatever is said to the public, they need to say it with as much caution as possible.

Please, do not blame them, they are doing their jobs, even though the intensity of the situation is getting worse. The latter seems more possible than the former as we have analysts who predict what the future holds.

The region has educated people with skills, thus we should not put it past them for having known that we will be hit by the crises. What we should, however, ask is whether something is being done to curb the crises from worsening.

Guess who is affected the most by this? Yes, those poverty-stricken people in Havana, Okahandja Park, 7de laan and so forth who apparently survive on US$2 a day. I do not mean all people who live in that area are poverty-stricken.

No, please do not get me wrong. Despite the seriousness of the situation, many people think the authorities are not doing much and/or enough to sort out the issue. This is only because they do not see what exactly is being done to stabilise the situation. Do not be of an idle mind. We all need to do something to assist our region in achieving all the plans it set.

As clichéd as it may sound, change starts with you. Instead of wasting water, let us try to save. Instead of sleeping with the lights on, let us learn to sleep with the lights off to save power. All these things can be done if we put our minds to it. If anyone cared to ask me, I would say the different SADC governments are trying their best.

But of course due to our human nature, we always find reason to complain about everything. We want to see tangible results, which will most probably yield short-term benefits before we move five steps back because we were too quick to act. As much as we cry for short-term solutions, the cost at which they come is exhorbitant.

To prove that something is being done, the SADC Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP) is underway, even though it leaves one pondering whether the plan is a little too ambitious or not. The idea was birthed as early as 2003, and even then did not yield any fruits. Visible developmental projects were not seen in the region.

This is in addition to the power and water crises-curbing measures the region is using to bring the situation under control. We are a long way away as our region is very dry, but let us be patient. business@thevillager. com.na