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Other Articles from The Villager

Life oozes through JacquieÔÇÖs sketches

Mon, 4 August 2014 22:12
by Andreas Kathindi





In Jacquie Tarr’s first official solo exhibition in the country, water and ink collide in an explosion life, and from life around her, Tarr draws her inspiration. The exhibition titled ‘Sketches from Life’ showing at Franco-Namibia Cultural Centre’s (FNCC) La Bonne Table is being used as a fundraiser for the Have a Heart project which encourages responsible pet ownership and offers spay and neuter services to pet owners with little or no income.
The seasoned Namibian artist taps into the spirit of her charity as animals are the recurring theme of her exhibition. Bar a few paintings, her collection almost seems to be a mixture of the abstract and actual recreations of nature. Colours dance beyond the edges of their limitations, leaving just enough to the eye to make out that it is indeed a bird, or a cat, or an elephant you are looking at. Beyond that, the imagination is left unfettered.
Lovers of the outdoors, particularly the desert will find the exhibition quite satisfying as Tarr’s use of the watercolours produces an effect especially akin to the dry lands. Her depiction of the elephant is a personal favourite. The large animal appears slender and yet wide. Majestically it trots on with a watery trunk before it.
As you look on, you’re almost reminded that we are not alone in the ecosystem, and our actions affect the animals as well. Each animal is depicted in its natural habitat. The cheetah lurks behind tall blades of grass, awaiting prey, perhaps the springbok in another painting not too far. These also attend to a nice bit of grass, with one springbok keeping a good eye of what’s behind them. Tarr’s titles are straight to the point. Dog, cat, elephant is all the thought she cares to put into the title, as enough of that goes to the actual creation.
Paintings are often known for being quite pricy, as value is added to them depending on the artist, but Tarr’s prices will certainly not put a frown of any art lover with an average earning. Most paintings go for around N$500.