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Other Articles from The Villager

Art about the parliament

Tue, 1 July 2014 16:25
by Andreas Kathindi


 

Plucked from the National Art Gallery’s permanent collection several art pieces have found themselves a new home in government offices across the country.
A specific bunch that I spotted at the Parliament Restaurant at a recent visit is quite worthy to add colour to the setting of our Nation’s decision makers as they rest, think of them as you will.
 Besides that, they also serve as a note of the country’s talent and cultural pride to the random foreigner that find themselves sipping on a cup of coffee in the restaurant.
An epitome of the latter is one titled ‘Cultural Wealth.’ A drinking cup made from a calabash fruit that is intrinsic to many African communities as a drinking vessel is the centre of this artistic expression.
 From its opening, water gushes to quench the thirst of whoever owns it, but that is not what stands out about this particular drinking bowl. An orange cloth is wrapped around the vessel, and tied to it are colourful traditional beads that garnish the delicious array of colour. Interwoven into the shell of the calabash is Namibia’s prime meat export, as several cows dance in meadows across it.
Next to it is a painting a black woman with a clearly white hands stretching forth carrying a bucket of fish. There is a crown upon her head, and a white being participating in a weird dance behind her. Whether this is a reversal statement on the social phenomenon that is skin bleaching, only the artist would know, but it demands thinking on.