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Other Articles from The Villager

Retro work of the veterans

Tue, 6 May 2014 06:40
by Andreas Kathindi


Avamp, showing in the lower gallery of the National Art Gallery of Namibia (NAGN), is a graphic art exhibition revisiting previously showcased art.
Although the artwork has been shown before, it is still a fresh reminder of the talent that has graced the nation. All of the exhibiting artists are well-travelled veterans who have showcased all over the world and now bring a rich history with their individual artworks, giving the entire venture a blissful, almost retro feel.
Fritz Krampe, a former German World War II soldier whose last solo exhibition was in 1965, a year before he was killed by an elephant in the Anaikatti jungle of India, magnificently etches a member of the San people by means of lithography on paper. He skilfully manages to translate on paper all the rough edges of the man. The only regrettable thing is; the portrait is called ‘Bushman’. Although undated, this perhaps serves as a perfect token of the times it was created in.
Shiya Karuseb’s ‘The Fear of the African Women’ depicts a tall man walking on skeletons burdened with what appears to be carrying a large green baggage as the heads of numerous women, from below, look on. However, at a closer look, you can see two people, more like twins, in a foetal position in his baggage.
The exhibition ends on 8th July and is well-worth anyone’s time for sure.