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Other Articles from The Villager

I say NO to organised religion

Tue, 22 April 2014 03:28
by Chris-Paul
Columns

Due to public demand to expand on what I believe in, following my article a fortnight ago, here’s an explanation...
The difference between me and many others out there is, I’m able to see religion as a fraud and not be afraid to call it exactly that. That doesn’t mean I disrespect those who believe in it, however.
Imagine how evil this planet would be if we didn’t have the threat of an everlasting burning in hell in the afterlife for the wicked!
Poor people need something to believe in and hold onto; some shred of faith, hope even.
Belief brings a sense of belonging and direction. Sadly, it has been used for fraudulent reasons, to steal from the poor and ill-informed.
It is easy to have a philosophy, the difficulty lies in living by it. Concepts and ideas can sometimes define people when they are unsure what they believed in, in the first place.
Coming to Namibia from Nigeria with a church has no doubt proven to be a profitable venture by those who want us to believe despite all the problems in their homeland, God has chosen to send them to save this particular country and not theirs.
Everyone has a right to their own truths, alright, some even change or reform with age, experience and enlightenment.
Very few of us who were raised with a Christian background go the extra mile of researching on other religions and their histories, because in Sunday school, we are taught to just have faith no matter what.
The church tells you to have faith despite contradictions and warns you of people like me through whom faith and fear of the unknown have been taken advantage of.
Religion is something akin to a cured disease, once feared but at least for me, now quelled by vaccination.
And that vaccination, my friend, is the search for general knowledge.
Religion was once used to enslave us and it’s a pity we still use it to enslave ourselves.
To religious readers, I appreciate your disapproval regarding my insensibilities to your slave master - white Jesus - but isn’t it funny how it becomes a taboo when we ask questions about him?
I am intrigued, even at times mesmerised, by religion and the people who inhabit its mythological terrain.
I have no real use for it as a solution for anything binding or true, really. I have said it before; looking for truth in churches, as history evidently proves, is like boarding a train to Johannesburg and expecting to end up at the Archway tube station in London. Waiting for Jesus on Judgement Day is like waiting for Tupac Shakur to return.
And yes; I believe there is a higher power, because there is no way the universe could have happened by accident. Some people call that higher power God and others, science. I just haven’t got a name for it yet.