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Other Articles from The Villager

Of sellout black middle class


by Job S. Amupanda
Columns

 

In discussing bloody contradictions that exist in our society, observers often place emphasis on incongruity between those having water for dinner (poor majority) and those dying of obesity (rich minority). 

Some would refer to the poor majority as the lower class and rich minority as the upper class. 

“If there is  upper class and lower class, what is in-between?” You might be perplexed. Yes, there is something in-between; it is called the middle class - our concern today. 

Considering that many are not imbued  with knowledge of items like class; we shall not inform them that the upper class are those owning the means and modes of production while the lower class are those who don’t. We would look for simplified definitions. The upper class are wealthy bastards living in rich neighborhoods - those that own factories, mines, companies and all that concern our economy. The upper classes are those that fly to Cape Town for dinner and those whose children regard the absence of dessert a terrible disaster. 

The lower class is the opposite; they never eat in a restaurant or will they ever set a foot in the Catholic Hospital; those conditioned to mahangu/maize for breakfast, lunch and dinner forever. They are those feared by the upper class when they roll their window at traffic lights - the hopeless majority at informal settlements and remote villages.

Who are the middle (black) class then?  The middle class are not those without education or those ‘sello taped’ by poverty; they are the educated professionals in the public and private sector. They are not the owner of the means of production or those with noise making stomachs; they are employees of the upper class who are working tirelessly towards profit to water their bosses Bahamas holiday.

The middle class poses an immediate link to the lower and working class. Before they became professionals, they were also in the muddy lower class. Through perseverance and determination; they broke prison bars of poverty and transcended into ‘middle-class.’ It is legitimately expected that they would liberate those they left in ‘prison’. 

Indeed, it is expected of them to arrest poverty and action radical change towards the dictatorship of the poor majority.

How did the black middle class sold-out?  It abandoned its obligation to the lower class. In Namibia, a sickening capitalists state, the black middle class truly abandoned that responsibility. Disgracefully, it joined the upper class in sabotaging and molesting the lower class without mercy. For such state of affairs, we recognise it as sellout black middle class. In his recent book ‘The Death of Our Society’, Political Scientist, Prince Mashele, indicates how it found refuge in capitalists umbrellas of exclusion. They now wear exploitative jackets of white supremacy and possess speedy desire of comprehending golf. 

The black middle class are so foolish, Mashele writes, “that they detest clothes that are made locally, and they do not drink alcohol that is brewed by a local brewer…they will have to stop hankering after big cars and expensive alcohol as their ultimate purpose in life.” Now married to the upper class imbeciles, the sellouts are a lost opportunity and nuisance to the lower class. 

The middle class is easy to identify in a capitalist state. In securing employment, they immediately get bonded to white banks to purchase cars. When in these on-credit-cars, they are so happy for such is the arrival of heaven on earth. To remind them of those yawning with vibrating stomachs is to remind a politician of poverty - something known and not cared about.  As they drive to and from work, they speedily pass-by lower class using natural transportation – footing.  

Of those in Windhoek; they despise Katutura terribly although their umbilical cords were terminated at Katutura hospital.  They are responsible for policy formulations in both private and public sector victimising their race (idiots). They push policies preventing the poor to populate the Central Business Districts. They have forgotten too soon that their relatives sold kapana. They preside over meetings that retrench workers and refuse lower class proposals for better remuneration.

Shocking observations is that of their children unable to release a word in their mother language. The middle class parents find joy in such stupidity ostensibly because their children are ‘receiving sophisticated education that does not allow them to learn their language.’ Such shocking idiotic parenting is alarming for next is children ‘Michael-Jacksoning’ their skin. Nothing positive about blackness manifest from the mouth of these spoilt brats. Scandalously, these brats start renaming themselves to white names. They are taught to associate with white kids for such is ‘wise.’ When their boys reach teenage-hoods, they only have one dream; kissing and sexing white girls (same with girls).  Such is their life purpose. These brats never go to their grandparents because villages are apparently “sunny” as if the sun never heat towns and cities.

In light of such depressing state of affairs, the lower class are left in the cold; left to die of poverty and keep paying pastors for ‘miracles’; their two year old are swallowing stones while their counterparts are throwing away sweets; they are insignificant for their significance come after five years (elections) lasting for two days; they are left with no one but themselves. They may hope; yes, they must that among them will emerge one that will inspire the rest and devise a formula for liberation. 

Till Second Half – Hear and be Heard.

 

 

shipululo@gmail.com

Job Shipululo Amupanda is a Political Science Candidate at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa