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Other Articles from The Villager

SallyÔÇÖs Courage now out

Mon, 19 November 2012 10:13
by Monica Pinias


local songstress, Sally’s long-awaited album, ‘Courage’, which seems to be some sort of dedication to women, is finally in music stores.
The 16-track album starts off with a rather interesting song titled, ‘Hallo Namibia’ in which Sally greets the nation in different local languages.
The song has slow African rhythms to it, complimented by the sound of drums in the background.
Her hit single, ‘Share My Love’ (track three), is an upbeat song in which she talks about sticking together in relationships despite the challenges. It’s one of those songs you play on repeat on a busy house-chores day.
Although the Inna Gorroh-produced ‘Share my Love’ is outstanding, the songs that will make people scramble for this album’s CD, are ‘Eehamba’ (12) and ‘Ngeno’ (14), even though ‘Boss Madam’, gives us a side of sweet Sally we don’t really know.
Given that she has always been a dull performer, track five unleashes the lioness within Sally as per her dance moves. In this track, she urges women to be assertive if they want to be the number-one people in their partners’ lives.
Her voice sounds very confident and joyous, which makes this song a hit.
Track seven, ‘Rumbasa’, is a club hit, with kwasa beats and a little bit of house. In this one, she sings about the mentality of the modern Namibian.
Track 11 featuring Cashley is all about matters of the heart. It is meant for mature listeners but especially suited for a Sunday afternoon during family time.
My favorite song in the album has to be track 16; ‘The Whistler Song’. It has slow an mellow beats and is one of those songs you listen to while reminiscing on the good times.