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Other Articles from The Villager

NACÔÇÖs PR sucks


by the Villager Editor
Editorial

Senior employees at the Namibia Airports Company (NAC) just like the board have mistaken the size of chaos in the happenings of the company as a license that gives them the freedom to bully everyone who challenge their way, and if need be,  use scare tactics to subdue them.


That the NAC public relations office led by one Ms Mia Davids chooses which publications to reveal issues of national concern at will is hazardous.


The Villager, after its intricate investigations on the company has been left out of the company’s media release on its restructuring process. And the reason, ‘we are in a democratic country where we choose who to communicate with’, is a lousy one, from its head of PR.


One gets a feeling that this is the same syndrome affecting the NAC today, persecuting the souls of the employees, that pain compounded by increasing standards of living, a state of confusion created by a leadership that appears helpless to lead the way during difficult times for this strategic company.


What more does the Minister of Works and Transport want when the social fabric of employees is being torn apart?

To wait for a commission which he himself appointed? It is almost definite that the Minister will not be harsh on the NAC board, the same board that instructs its PR team to disassociate themselves from The Villager.


Instead of calling for a press conference to elaborate on its restructuring process, the NAC fears a media backlash and decides to pay for a Press Statement to appear in all the newspapers except The Villager.


It is not The Villager that Mia and her superiors are punishing by withholding information from this newspaper but it is our readers – the taxpaying public who are the real owners of the company – that are denied the information.


It is such type of PR hooliganism that is clearly rampant within NAC and which will keep us asking more questions; that the NAC, a public institution withholds information from inquisitive publications like ours.


We have sent questions, and requested for public documents from the NAC PR, all which were ignored.

They seem to be waiting for us to write a lie and respond, so far there is no response because everything has been plain truth.


From a distance, we are waiting for the formal letter to bring us before a Ministerial Commission to ask us where we got the information. Utter hogwash.

We got that information from Mia Davids!
Concentrate on resolving the crisis not where we got the answers from, if Mia does not want to talk to us.


The commission should start by not ignoring the fact NAC officials have been allowed to behave as if they have turned into some kind of super chiefs, in imaginary kingdoms on Mars, where they are not answerable to anyone?


And where is the Anti Corruption Commission?


NAC, even after the restructuring, as long as it has this same board and people like Mia Davids withholding information, choosing where to disseminate vital issues of national importance, remain a team at the cross-roads, crippled by a questionable leadership, a questionable board, a dwindling staff morale and a soul that has been torn apart by the sum total of their struggles.


The time has come for this nonsense to be stopped and if the Minister cannot take firm action, the Prime Minister, should, or we can finally bury the term corporate governance in Namibia — which has been on life-support for some time now — in its grave.