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Rosalia Martins-Hausiku reappointed MVA boss

12/07/2018
by Kelvin Chiringa
News

The Motor Vehicle Accident Fund’s (MVA) Rosalia Martins-Hausiku has been reappointed as chief executive officer with effect from the 1st of October to the 31st of September 2023. 

Exclusively speaking to this publication, the soft-speaking Martins-Hausiku who was reportedly out of office until next week said she was quite honored to be afforded another tenure to run the fund. 

“It just means that the authorities still believe in my credibility, that we are there to deliver on the mandate that we have been given,” she said over the phone. 

Spelling part of her five-year strategic vision, she said more still needed to be done at the fund and this new tenure will see an upscaling and fine-tuning of objectives that were already in the pipeline. 

Introducing a more sustainable way of treating the fund’s patients will be core to her job, she tells The Villager, adding that they had already started with a housing modification process for seriously injured persons which will see perfection in the next five years.  

“Some of our clients don’t have their own houses, they don’t have land for us just to set up a structure that will assist them with their rehabilitation process. We want to modify the houses of injured persons,” she pointed out adding that ownership makes the job easier for the fund. 

The major headache that still remains as an albatross to the fund is accident and injury prevention and this needs a multi-stakeholder approach as well as lobbying for behavioral change on the part of drivers.  

The MVA Fund prides itself with a 94% and 82% score on customer and stakeholder satisfaction respectively and for Martins-Hausiku, it all boils down to simply implementing their customer service charter.  

“We have a service charter in place to assist members in the shortest period of time. As soon as one walks in our office, they must be acknowledged and attended to within five minutes,” she said.  

Meanwhile, Martins-Hausiku’s illustrious career has its genesis from the humble soil of Rundu where she grew up in a family of four and completed her primary education.

At age 15, she left for high school education in Tsumeb at Etosha Secondary School where she matriculated in 1999 before enrolling at the University of Namibia (UNAM) for a Bachelor in Media Studies which she com­pleted in 2003.

She also is a holder of a Master’s in Business Leadership from the University of South Africa’s (UNISA’s) School of Busi­ness Leadership as well as a Master’s in Culture and Communication from the University of KwaZulu Natal  and a certificate in Fi­nance and Accounting from Wits Univer­sity.