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Other Articles from The Villager

Be aware of the dangers and legal implications of social media

04/07/2018
by staff writer
Business

 

FNB Namibia has co-sponsored talks on the dangers of social media and legal implications at various schools over the past few days. Invited guest, Diana Schwartz (LLB) was invited to hold these talks, which took place at schools across Windhoek. Diana is a Social Media law expert in media law and child rights activist as well as an expert in labour law, media/entertainment law, commercial litigation and intellectual property law. She is very involved with the protection of children and their rights in the area of social media law. 

Staying safe online is an important issue for young people using the internet, especially with cyberbullying, catfishing and cyberstalking becoming increasingly serious. “Children can stay safe online by checking their privacy settings, and making sure what they’re showing to the general public. Never agree to meet people that you've never met in real life. This could be dangerous, as that 14-year-old boy you think you’re talking to could be a sexual predator. To avoid this don't agree to meet up, no matter how good it may seem and always tell your parents. Keep details such as full names, address, mobile number, email address, school name and friends’ full names secret” advises Schwartz. 

She further advises parents to fill the role of a parent, even if it’s not always easy. Paedophiles groom children by building relationships with them to gain their trust before violating them. This is why parents need to pay closer attention to their child's behaviour and online presence.

Christine Thompson from Radiowave said that various social media and networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are commonly used by children and teens. “As much as they allow children to communicate and express their creativity, connect with peers, and share their feelings, they can be an avenue through which our children are exposed to harm. This is why initiatives such as these are of such importance, and we would like to thank all the sponsors that made Diana’s visit possible; Africa Personnel Services, FNB Namibia, Alexander Forbes and Cecil Nurse. ” 

“Online safety is one of FNB’s main priorities, be it online banking, the protection of our customers or even keeping our youth safe online. This indeed is a worthy cause, because we know the power of education,” says Elzita Beukes, Communication Manager at FNB Namibia.