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Other Articles from The Villager

Security guard's "31 bullet story' takes new twist...accused of exaggerating injuries by his bosses

24/05/2018
by Rosalia David
News

The boss and supervisor of Andreas Matheus ,who told The Villager this week that he sustained 31 bullet wounds after he and his colleagues went after suspected poachers two weeks ago, have accused him of exaggerating his injuries.

Matheus’ supervisor, Christo Dreyer, who spoke to The Villager today confirmed the shooting incident, but said he was injured by a fellow colleague who shot him with pellets that are now stuck in his flesh.

He confirmed that Matheus was indeed shot five times in one leg and 26 times in the other, of which the pellets were left lodged in his flesh.

Dreyer accused Matheus of wanting to make money from the incident that happened to him saying that he has no idea why he is keeping the whole truth.

“What happened was, Andreas and his colleagues went out in the field after hearing dogs barking and when they stopped barking, everyone came back together but him and his other colleague disappeared. So, on their way to meet the other troupe, the guys heard noise and shot the first warning shot,” he explained.

He explained that Andreas and his colleagues were operating in the dark, and that they all went to inspect the noises in different directions.

Dreyer told The Villager that Andreas panicked when a warning shot was fired and he tried to flee.

This in return caused his colleague to fire in his direction, causing the pellets to hit him, Dreyer said.

The owner of the anti-poaching company identified only as Derk said he had nothing to do with the incident and distanced himself from knowing Andreas.

“I have never met the guy you are talking about. My office is in Outjo. I was only informed about the incident by his supervisor. I don’t understand why my name is involved. He must not play with me, Ek gaan hom opnaai in die hof, hy moet nie my naam in goed gebruik wat ek nie van ken nie, hy gaan sy piel sien (I will f*ck him up in court, he must not use my name in things I don’t know about. He will see his d*ck),” he fumed.

He further advised this publication to rather speak to the supervisor whom he said had first-hand information.

Dreyer, also told The Villager that he paid for Andreas' medical bill, despite claims that the company refused to assist him after the shooting.

A proof of payment was then forwarded to The Villager which shows that Dreyer payed N$30. 00 at the Katutura State Hospital.

“I even stood for almost a whole hour at the pharmacy collecting his medicines. And I even heard that he was given N$500.00 by the guy who shot him where he used my name saying I told him that the person who shot him needs to pay,” he stressed.

Dreyer who expressed disappointment in Andreas' allegations against his employers explained that he was only booked off until the end of May, but that he wanted more time off.

“I spoke to him nicely and I suggested he stay in Okahandja as the month is almost over so that he would be on time for his next doctor’s appointment scheduled for the 6th of June but he didn’t want, he said he has decided to go to the north,” he said.

He however explained that he gave Andreas options to stay but ignored him saying that he had already made up his mind to leave.

“I am the one who even drove his belongings to the taxi because I was supposed to drop him at the buses, but when I got back from picking up other workers found him gone. I told him to wait for me after asking for a lift,” Dreyer said.