More articles in this category
Top Stories

Namibia, with other African heads of state have signed the first ever continental free trade deal this week at an AU Summit in Rwanda, but analyst...

A Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) student, Naeman Amakali, was killed on the spot when a taxi he was in was shot at by an unid...

Agribank chief executive officer, Sakaria Nghikembua, has refused to bow down to pressure from previously disadvantaged farmers who marched to the...

The local economy has been growing at a considerably good pace with an average rate of 4.48% reaching an all time high of 21% in the third quarter...

  As the nation prepares to celebrate the 28th year of Independence, Vibe took to the streets to speak to local entertainers on what Independe...

Swift action has been taken to bring under control the flooding situation observed at the Tsumeb Sports Field where the 28th independence celebrat...

Other Articles from The Villager

Over 30 000 learners fail English

by Rosalia David

Over 30 000 full-time and part-time NSSC ordinary level candidates who were registered with the Namibia College of Open Learning (Namcol) failed to obtain the required D grade in English 2nd language, Director of Namcol Heroldt Murangi said.

Speaking at a press conference yesterday, Murangi said the number of candidates who have failed to make it to tertiary level by failing English is worrisome, adding that these 30 000 might need entry to NAMCOL to improve their English.

“The number above means that a great number of these learners might seek entry to NAMCOL for the 2018 academic year to improve on their English results. The College only has the capacity to accommodate 18 000 learners,” he stressed.

Meanwhile, over 10 000 subject entries for NSSCO were recorded as incomplete.

Murangi further noted that there could be various reasons why candidates did not write exams or only wrote a few modules.

“Some learners did not sit for examination due to various reasons such as finding employment elsewhere, learners registering as a means of accessing social benefits such as pension fund and participating in the medical aid schemes of their parents,” Murangi explained.

He has asked that institutions such as GIPF request for school results before processing benefits for these learners.

Murangi also proposed to work with government institutions and medical aid providers sharing ideas on how to close the loopholes that currently exist within their respective systems.

 “I would like to urge parents to really look into these things because most learners are not in a controlled environment and therefore should pay more attention to the part time students,” he said.

The number of learners that have not entered for the JSC examination sums up to 4 398 which is a 15.5%.

He further encouraged learners who wish to join NAMCOL to focus on their studies so that they can pass and give a chance to those who also wish to register but cannot because of the limited space.