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Other Articles from The Villager

Nakathila’s stars shine brighter … as he talks about his latest fight

05/12/2017
by Staff Writer
Sports

Namibia’s junior category boxing wonder-boy, Jeremiah “Low Key” Nakathila, has said his opponent, Sibusiso Zingange, was too scared to stand the might of his heavy punches which resulted to his being knocked flat out in front of jeering crowds here in the capital this past weekend.

Nakathila came out of a highly sensational boxing bonanza victorious, after flooring Zingange in the fifth round, flaunting his WBO Africa Junior Lightweight belt and he challenged every other boxer in his division.

The boxer oozes with the confidence of a typical champion on the rise and walks with the flex of a pompous braggart.

Speaking to The Villager this week, Low Key says he has immense trust in his power and style and he had already rated his opponent prior to the fight as more of an easy-job.

“It was an obvious thing you know. It was just my corner you know, I try to follow my corner because I do not rush but if I had to rush, I know I would have been too strong for him,” says the 15 time boxing champion without mincing words.

Already prior to the fight, the boxer was questioning the credentials of Zingange who seemed not to have any footprints on YouTube or other social media platforms. 

He says, given a chance, he could have finished his fight within just three rounds as he had the advantage of home ground and previous weeks of intensive training that had prepared him to give the South African a taste of typical “Low Key” shock combat. 

“It was just that I had to follow my corner. I took my time. Had I come so aggressively then I was really going to attack him. I would have really finished him that time,” he says. 

And it seems his camp was trying to buy time and slow down the spectacle as a treat to the raucous crowds that were baying for blood. 

Very impressive is Nakathila’s confidence and for a boxer who had urged The Villager Sport reporters to show up early for the weekend fight else the bout would end at the earliest, the future looks appealing. 

Speaking of Zingange, it seems he took the pleasure of killing him softly yet with impact and he seemed to read his mind as he floundered in the ring trying desperately to get a break past the stout Namibian athlete. 

“I just stressed him a bit with my power and I could see that he was getting scared. Somewhere somehow, he was already aware that this guy (Nakathila) you have to be very careful because he is strong. I did not see that fight going to 12 rounds,” he says.

Now, it stands for his promoters to see if the young pugilist is ready for an international tour but he already sounded itching for one. 

“It’s just for them to tell me that ok, rest for a week or two then be back in the gym again. But the way forward is actually in the hands of my promoter,” he said. 

Low Key has a stain to his record as his attempts to reach for the WBO Inter-Continental super featherweight were lost to Russia’s Evgeny Chuprakov.

That high profile bout goes down as the only defeat he has suffered in his professional boxing career, one he seeks to bury as he rises to the top.