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Sakaria ‘Desert Storm’ Lukas keeps eyes on the ball

15/09/2017
by Kelvin Chiringa
Sports

Namibia’s top ?ying undefeated WBO Africa Featherlight Champion Sakaria “Desert Storm,” Lukas says he is all about representing his country, make a name for himself and take care of his family.

The champ spoke to The Villager Sport shortly after coming out of the tempest of “No Mercy Part 7” where he resoundingly defended his title against Uganda’s Mudde Rabisa, and he had a word or two for his fans and those whose eyes are set on his 20 wins and zero losses record.

He poured cold water on social media rants that the Namibian boxing camp is wasting time ?ghting African “amateur” boxers without daring the storms outside Africa “where the real dogs of war are”. “Everybody is entitled to say what they like, but the thing is I can’t defend an African belt with someone from Japan or somebody from America. An African belt has to be defended and fought for among Africans,” he calmly says.

Pressed on how hard it has been to land ?ghts abroad in his quest to make high global rankings, Desert Storm says it is not as easy as cutting butter with a hot knife as local boxers are not yet adequately resourced. “It’s not very easy because we do not have TV and we don’t have money, and if we had these two things, we would be doing business and challenging people outside Africa. How can we do that with nobody coming on board and supporting us to showcase what we do? We are grateful to MTC for what they are doing. With limited resources we are bringing world titles and championships here,” he says.

Access to air time on HBO and the like has helped prop European and American boxers on the international scene. Coming out of his latest ?ght and still reigning supreme, the cold-eyed laid back boxer says he feels great. With 20 wins and Zero losses at the moment, The Villager wanted to get it from him whether he was aiming the throne from which Indongo has just abdicated.

“I feel great. I am not Indongo, I am Sakaria Lukas, and so I stand up to present my name just as Indongo does. I have to focus on what I have to do and do my best. I am not here to say I must be the next Harry Simon,” he says. But he feels his boys have done enough to put Namibia on the map, having brewed three world champions already and, hopefully, more coming up.

“With the little resources that we are having de?nitely yes, we have managed to put the country on the world map. Nestor Sunshine has produced three world champions although by the time Harry Simon became a world champion he was now with a South African promoter,” he says. The tough boxer says he is driven by ambition to get large and take his family along the star-spangled path of fame and glory although he is very aware that it will be “blood and tears all the way.” “Since day one, I have always wanted to represent my family, my village, my constituency, our region, our nation and Africa to become a world champion. That’s my dream. There won’t be short cuts. It’s blood and tears,” he says.

Taking us into the boxing ring, Sakaria says it is not as easy as it looks like every time he has to ?ght and adrenaline has to be fought ?rst to get a clear focus on the game plan and come out victorious. “The pressure is very high. I understand what I am going through so as the next guy I am ?ghting. It is all about your mindset before the ?ght. It comes back to your preparation. You can prepare well but come to the ?ght; you forget the entire game plan,” he says.

Meanwhile, the brute athlete says he is against domestic violence, and he believes only education and getting to the root problem than resorting to jail alone will work to curb the ongoing carnage “I am really against that. Namibia has very beautiful women. I think this is going to come to an end. It’s all about education,” he says.

For the boxing wannabees out there ardent for some glory, Lukas Sakaria says, “School ?rst and boxing later,” hinting that he met boxing at the school where he came out with ?ying colours but had to face the reality of failure to proceed for higher learning due to limited cash. He has been branded “The man to watch” by his stable.