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A night of music and stars with Slickartie and Sylent Nqo

Fri, 26 May 2017 18:27
by Kelvin Chiringa


Zimbabwean-born rising chanter Artwell ‘Slicka’ Neusu will bring his soulful musical act at the Goethe Institut on the 2nd of June’s Night under the stars in a compelling collaboration with instrumentalist-cum songster Sylent Nqo who is in Namibia for the show.

Night Under the stars has become a renowned revelers water point and the two have promised to bring on stage a natural mystic of hypnotizing music carried by the raw immense sound of instruments. “It feels really good to be in Namibia, this is actually my first time here, so it feels pretty awesome considering the fact that we’ve been talking about this for a while and then we actually made it happen,” said the sensational Nqo speaking to The Villager ahead of the show.

Having spent a few days in Namibia so far, and asked how he felt bout the country, Nqo beamed, “I have been to the Warehouse, and I can’t really say I have performed but Namibians really appreciate music. Not Zimbabwean or Namibian but music in general because there is nothing like Namibian music or Zimbabwean music, music is just one language.” Slickartie is a consistent performer who is synonymous with the Warehouse performances and doubles as a product of the College of the Arts with a love for acting and dancing. He could not hide his excitement at having his long time “brother in music” joining with him in Namibia for a show he said Namibians should brace for.

“We chose each other, because I always wanted to have his vocals, his instrumental playing skills and also a little bit of my craziness and creativity and come up with something unique,” enthused the out-spoken Slickartie.  As they chatted the Tuesday morning away with The Villager before a hilarious photo-shoot within the pristine natural light of the Goethe Institut, this reporter could not miss the brotherly aura between the two and the inherent connection of personality traits of laughter, easiness and free-speech with so much energy. And Slickartie was quick to reminisce on their olden days with a huge pat at the back of his “boy” hinting on how he desperately had always wanted to merge their talents and blow their fans out of their minds.

“Back in the day he (Nqo) was crazy, right now he is ten times more what he was back then. I never lost that eagerness to want to play with him. I am so glad it is happening now,” said Slick. Silent Nqo is an ardent performer whose voice lingers in the halls of Zimbabwe’s uptown reveler-joints like Book Café, Jazz 105 and the like. Asked whether the upcoming show would be Namibia’s treat of some of his best Jazz and Afro-fusion, the articulate visitor said he would not define his music although the audience will have to brace up for what he called, “world music.”

“I am a student of music and a slave of music, you get it? So if I wake up today and think I wanna create a song in Oshiwambo, I will. You get it? All I do is music; I am not a Jazz guitarist, Blues or Rock. I am a guitarist; you hear that?” he philosophized. And true to the trends, most musicians have come out to denounce the conventional definitions of what songs should be and in a more post modernist approach tend to fuse genres to come up with an entirely different and fresh package. Recently Elemotho shared the same sentiments in an exclusive engagement with this reporter a few days after the launch of his latest offering.

“No I doh wanna be defined,” he shot out hilariously chewing through his lunch in an interview his manager and wife had arranged for us. Meanwhile, the Goethe Institut’s Press and Communications Officer Lendl Isaacs has labelled the duo as “electric” and the upcoming show is said to “mesmerise” and “surprise” as the two will “Ooze with talent and a soul-caressing voice.”

Sylent Nqo will be on guitar and Slickartie on vocals and djembe as they will bring out their best for those with an ear for music and the rhythm of dance.