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Sally on a beat with Busiswa

Tue, 18 October 2016 18:34
by Kakuva Kiimwandi


‘Rumbasa’ songstress, Sally ( of BossMadam fame) recently released an energetic music video featuring South African sensation Busiswa on a track titled BimBim shot on location in Johanesburg, South Africa.
The songstress, who is also an ambassador for Sanlam Namibia, will be making a performance appearance at the Copper Festival Lite It Up concert in Tsumeb later this year, and has a nation-wide tour lined up for next year.
In an interview with Metro Sally said  she and her team approached Busiswa last year, and she was immediately willing to flame with Sally.
Sally also explained that she has not noticed a difference in Busiswa’s work ethic as a musician in comparison to other Namibian musicians. “It’s just that their understanding of things is on another level. Local artists tend to take everything personal and fail to see the business aspects of the collaboration as for them (international artists) a collabo has to make business sense, not just recording a song,” she said.
She is currently planning on releasing songs that she has collaborated on with other Namibian artists, although she would like to work with a few other women in the music industry on condition that they bring a lot to the table.
The songstress is also working on completing her next album although she cannot give away a date, and has made it clear that she is not looking at recreating Boss Madam during her next projects.
“’Boss Madam’ will forever be the song that gave me the recognition I needed, but I’m an artist with many ideas and I have to move on. Look at Natural’, again another banger that changed the game. I’m on to the next one,” she said.
Sally says she has been able to make it to Trace Africa, Mzanzi and MTV base by keeping focus on music and only on music, saying that it takes hard work, consistency and talent.
She also shares that she has other talents beyond music this including sewing, which she has taken so seriously that now she creates all her stage costumes and the outfits she wears at events. She also has been able to keep her hidden talent on fixing cars, as she says she even helps her brother at his garage. “I am a mini mechanic”, she said.
For Sally music has no retirement age, therefore does not foresee when she might give up her lyrical gloves.
She also said that despite being a regular performer she still gets nervous on stage.
“It doesn’t matter how many years I have been doing it for, I still get the buzz. Crowds differ and you have to find a way to adapt to your environment”.
Sally said that she has observed the faults of the music industry that have contributed to the demise of many music careers, especially those of female artists and that comes down to management in her opinion.
“A lot of artists have not had the opportunity to work with the right management that had long term plans for them. Things like pregnancy and marriage also play a role. It is assumed they will not be the same artists that people will admire and love once that happens. In most cases I have seen female artists wanting to be treated like queens, millionaires before they do the actual work of acquiring true fans, sustainable sound or genre before testing and knowing their market, these are the things that play at odds. With female artists, they want to look the part and not be the part. You have to go out there and do the donkey work. You have to be a hustler and have tough skin,” Sally said.
Being both a mother, wife and an artist, Sally said she prioritises at the end of the day lies with her family and her business.  
“Most of all without God, then the home is divided, so my policy is God over everything. He leads the way. I also have a good support system from my team, my dancers, my management and my affiliates. Always appreciate those around you and watch how everything falls into place,” she said.